Kicking off our tour of parks, with a visit to Tahoe!

 

This week, the AIR Adventures team kicked off our tour of national and state parks, which will take us through some of the most beautiful landscapes in the American West!

We started things off with a trip to Lake Tahoe, which some have heralded as “the best lake in America.”

Situated on the border of California and Nevada, Lake Tahoe is the largest alpine lake in North America, and the second deepest after Crater Lake in Oregon. The majority of the lake’s watershed is protected land, with several state parks including Sand Harbor; Sugar Pine Point; Spooner Lake; and of course the eponymous Lake Tahoe State Park.

The area is popular year-round – offering a myriad of lakeside activities in the summer, and skiing or snowboarding in the winter. Apart from being an Instagram-perfect vacation destination, though, Lake Tahoe also provides important ecological benefits as a watershed. Additionally, it’s home to numerous protected or endangered species, including the bald eagle and kokanee salmon, as well as rare plant species like the Lake Tahoe watercress.

On our visit, we took advantage of the beautiful blue-sky July weather to explore the region by bike and by foot. Our first venture took us on a 70+ mile bike ride around the entire lake, which included 4,000+ feet of climbing over a mix of long, gradual mountain inclines  and gentle rollers.

IMG_0355
The area has several miles of bike trails, taking you along the outskirts of the lake and through rolling countryside.

Throughout the ride, we were afforded panoramic vistas of the lake and surrounding mountains, which were surprisingly still snow-capped in late July owing to the record snowfall the region received this past winter. The views were only somewhat marred by the seemingly endless traffic in both directions (FYI, if you’re not already aware, you could say that Lake Tahoe is *somewhat* of a popular tourist destination. On the weekend we were there, it seemed like everyone within a 2,000 mile radius also had the same idea to visit. It was crowded). However, even with the bumper-to-bumper traffic, cars were generally respectful, and gave us plenty of room to pass.

Check out our ride here!

The next day, we opted to avoid dealing with traffic and  ventured out for a run along the trails of Spooner Lake State Park. This Nevada park is about 8 miles to the east of Lake Tahoe, and is home to two  equally picturesque lakes of its own: Spooner and Marlette. Our run took us point-to-point from one lake to the other, and back along the Marlette Lake Trail. The route climbed over 1,600 feet through rustling alpine groves and  high mountain meadows – with epic mountain views the entire way.

IMG_0367
Exploring the Marlene Lake trail, on a brilliant late summer afternoon.

Check out our route here!

Interested in going? Be advised that Lake Tahoe and surrounding areas are popular year-round, and can be particularly crowded on weekends and holidays. Plan in advance and make your reservations early. If you’re looking to do a hike or trip to the beach, you should also arrive early in the morning, as parking fills up quickly. (On our bike ride, we observed no less than 4 rather heated arguments over parking. Don’t be one of those guys – plan in advance.)

As for the state parks in the area: they will likely require a fee of $6 – $10. Most are dog and mountain-bike friendly, but be sure to check signs beforehand.

Finally, it’s important to note that despite being a beloved travel destination, Lake Tahoe is under threat due to development and associated pollution. Studies estimate that the clarity of the lake has decreased substantially due to pollution from stormwater runoff associated with construction. Pollution of the lake in turn affects species that depend upon it for survival, including those found in the Truckee River fed by the lake. That said, efforts by local environmental groups like Keep Tahoe Blue have made substantial gains in protecting and restoring the lake and surrounding areas.

Interested in supporting global conservation efforts? Then check out the website of our sister organization, the Alliance for International Reforestation, here!

Next stop: Craters of the Moon National Monument!

 

 

 

 

 

In celebration of national parks – preserving ‘everyone’s stories’ (part 2).

Some 145 years ago on March 1, 1872, then-president Ulysses S. Grant signed a bill creating the nation’s first national park – Yellowstone. However, it wasn’t until decades later, in 1916, that the National Park Service (NPS) was created to manage and protect the large – and growing – number of parks throughout the U.S. The battle to protect the Grand Canyon was instrumental to the development of the NPS.

In our last blog entry, we highlighted the environmental value of our national parks. This latest entry focuses on their historical value – and the role they play in preserving ‘everyone’s stories.’

While national parks play a prominent role in protecting natural landscapes and unique environments, they play an equally important role in protecting the diverse histor(ies) of our nation – dating back to the Paleo-Indian tribes who first set foot in North America some 12,000 years ago.

The iconic Grand Canyon is a prime example of a park preserving both nature and history. As one of the Seven Natural Wonders of the World, the Grand Canyon has become a worldwide symbol for the grandeur of the American West. The park – designated as a UNESCO World Heritage site – is over 1.2 million acres in the northwest part of Arizona. The canyon itself is a geological marvel, averaging a depth of 4,000 feet for roughly 277 miles. Moreover, the park provides a wealth of biological diversity with three different desert types and five distinct ‘life zones’ – each home to several rare and endemic plant and animal species like the desert bighorn sheep and desert shrew.

Moreover, the Grand Canyon also played a pivotal role in the development of our National Park System: it was in part out of a desire to protect the canyon that Stephen Mather fought to establish the NPS, as a way of better managing and protecting the parks. While the Grand Canyon did not gain official park status until 1919, nearly 3 years after the NPS was established, many credit it with Mather’s drive to develop and lead the NPS as its first director.

The human history of the Grand Canyon dates back much further than the creation of the NPS, of course: artifacts dating back nearly 12,000 years have been discovered within the canyon, evidence of early Paleo-Indian tribes. Currently, 11 traditionally-associated tribes and historic ethnic groups are involved in co-managing the park, as part of the preservation of their cultural heritage. These include the Havasupai, Hopi, Hualapai, Navajo, Paiute, White Mountain Apache, Yavapai Apache, and Zuni tribes.

Interested in visiting? Check out the park’s website here, which includes information on how to plan your visit, as well as important weather advisories. The AIR Adventures team had the privilege of visiting as part of our cross-country road trip in 2015. We stayed at the historic El Tovar Hotel, built in 1905 on the South Rim. We recommend taking some time to hike or run the Bright Angel Trail, a 6 mile one-way trail that starts from the South Rim and takes you on a scenic tour into the canyon. A note of caution, though! The trail goes straight down – meaning the distance you go down equals the distance you have to come back up! Do not underestimate the challenge of the hike back out of the canyon.

Fee? Yes – $30 per vehicle.

Bikes? Yes – in designated areas. Rentals are available on the South Rim.

Dogs? Yes – in designated areas, and on leashes. The South Rim trails are particularly dog friendly.

Interested in learning more? Then check out the Grand Canyon site here, or to learn more about the NPS and its history, check out their webpage here.

Interested in supporting global conservation efforts? 

Then check out the Alliance for International Reforestation, a globally-recognized organization dedicated to sustainable, community-based reforestation efforts. Pledge to donate today!

In celebration of national parks (part 1).

Did you know that the U.S. National Park Service covers more than 84 million acres of land, employs over 22,000 workers, and had over 307 million visitors in 2015?

From the subtropical wilderness of the Everglades in Florida, to the arctic tundra of Denali – the environmental, historical, and social value of our national parks is immeasurable.

In this first entry of a 3-part series, we highlight the environmental value of our 59 national parks – what many consider to be ‘America’s Best Idea.’ We write this series out of incredible appreciation for these national symbols and treasures – and also out of concern for their future preservation.

This past year, the AIR Adventures team undertook an epic cross-country road trip, from east coast to west coast, where we were able to experience firsthand the wonders of our most famous and treasured parks, including the Grand Canyon, Mesa Verde, and Death Valley – to name a few.

Of all the parks we saw, the one that stands out as best capturing their collective environmental value is the iconic Yosemite.

This park, one of the oldest in the National Park System, covers an astonishing 747, 956 acres in the Sierra Nevada mountain range in northern California, with ~95% of it  designated as wilderness. While Yosemite is internationally renowned for its impressive granite formations and its contributions to epic vacation photos, few realize the important role the park plays in supporting plant and animal life: the park claims five distinct vegetation zones, and more than 225,000 acres of old growth forest – with untouched groves of fir, pine, and ancient sequoias. This habitat is home to over 250 species of animals – including the protected Sierra Nevada bighorn sheep and red fox. Apart from providing an important habitat for wildlife, these trees also provide an important source of sequestration for CO2 and other greenhouse gases.

img_0660
Thank you, Yosemite, for being you. And for the epic photos. Not to mention protection of plant and animal diversity and source of carbon sequestration. And oh yes the water. 

Yosemite offers more than habitat for regional flora and fauna, however. Thee park supports life in California more generally, as the Hetch Hetchy reservoir, located within the park, is a central water supply for Northern California. An estimated 85% of San Francisco’s water comes from this reservoir.

Finally, it’s worth noting that Yosemite’s environmental value is equalled only by its historical value: it was this park, and John Muir’s commitment to protecting it, that spurred development of the National Park System.

Interested in going? We recommend a visit to Yosemite for anyone with a passion for the environment, outdoor adventures, and/or history. The park offers plenty of opportunities for both daylong and extended stays – check out all their offerings for both individuals and families here. But plan well in advance! This is one of our nation’s most popular parks, and reservations for both campgrounds as well as hotels fill up quickly.

During our trip, AIR Adventures took to the trails in and around the valley for what proved to be one of our favorite trail running expeditions to-date. A particularly beautiful – and challenging! – route took us from the valley floor to the top of Yosemite Falls. The route was fairly short, about 7.2 miles round-trip, but packed in a whopping 2,700 feet of elevation gain in the initial climb up! Check out the route here.

Fee? Yes – $30 per vehicle, $15 per pedestrian or bike. (Or you can get a national park pass, which we highly recommend!)

Dogs or other pets? Yes – on leashes and on designated trails.

Bikes? Road – yes; MTB – no.

Stay tuned for our next entry in this series!

Update: The Trump administration has issued a media blackout for the National Park System. And Congress has recently passed legislation that will make it easier to sell off public lands – including national parks. More recently, Congress has voted to make it easier to drill in national parks, and is now moving to repeal the 1973 Endangered Species Act. Concerned? Then call your representative: 202.224.3121. This number will allow you to connect with your Senate and House representative

Interested in supporting global conservation efforts? Then check out the Alliance for International Reforestation here: http://www.airguatemala.org

Trail running holiday! Deep South style.

Welcome back from the holidays, and Happy 2017, y’all!

We here at AIR Adventures hope you spent plenty of quality time with family, friends, and – of course – exploring the great outdoors.

For our part, we did all of the above. Our travels took us from the west coast back to the Deep South of the east (beast?) coast – specifically Georgia and Florida. We spent our first few days exploring the trails of North Georgia, in the beautiful Smithgall Woods, and later on to the swamps and sugar sand trails of North and Central Florida.

Some of our Florida favorites included:

  1.  Tom Brown Park, a 255 acre park on the east side of Tallahassee. The park boasts several recreational areas – including a frisbee golf course, BMX track, and miles of trails. Perhaps most notable of the park’s offerings is the plethora of native plants, birds, and other wildlife that it protects. It borders Lake Lafayette, where one can expect to see a wide variety of wading birds – including the iconic great blue heron – as well as plenty of gators, of course.                                                                               Interested in exploring Tom Brown? Consider a trail running or mountain biking adventure: Like us, you can start on the Cadillac Trail – so named because of the old, rusted out 1960s model plopped conspicuously on one hairpin turn of the trail – and continue across the railroad tracks to the colloquially named ‘Bill’s Trail’ in Lafayette Trail Heritage Park. From here, you’ll catch glimpses of Lake Lafayette through the scrub oaks, as you head into the neighboring J.R. Alford Greenway. Check out our mapped trail run here! Fee? No. Dogs? On leashes. MTB? Yes – in some areas.

    img_3032
    Railroad tracks on a misty morning along Lake Lafayette.
  2. Seminole State Forest, which includes 1,725 acres of protected sand pine scrub around the Wekiva River Basin. This park provides important habitat for several rare and threatened species, including the Florida black bear and indigo jay. It also offers over 21 miles of hiking trails, 23 miles of designated horseback trails, and 25 miles of designated MTB trails. Horseback and MTB use are restricted to designated trails. Interested in exploring Seminole State Forest? We definitely recommend this for trail running and MTB alike – the trails are well-maintained, and the famous Florida sugar sand will definitely challenge you! We parked at the trailhead just off SR 46, and took the orange trail to the white trail for a 10+ mile loop. Check out our mapped run here! Fee? Yes – check website for details. Dogs? On leashes. MTB? Yes – on designated trails/ Check signs!
  3. Lake Woodruff National Wildlife Refuge, a 22,000 acre protected area in Central Florida. The refuge provides a haven for numerous native plants and animals, including several threatened or endangered species like the bald eagle, whooping crane, manatee, and gopher tortoise. Gators are also abundant here – and can be seen sunning themselves on the banks. There are several miles of constructed trails that are open to hiking, trail running, and MTB. This area is truly a hidden gem in central FL. We recommend visiting in late afternoon, when the setting sun turns the marshland to varying shades of pink and gold. Fee? No. Dogs? No. MTB? Yes – on designated trails.
fullsizerender
Gator sunning itself in Lake Woodruff.

Overall, our holiday break not only reminded us of the importance of quality family time – but also of the beauty and diversity of the natural habitats in the Deep South. We encourage you to visit these and other parks in the near future, and learn more about the important work they do to protect these priceless natural resources.

Interested in supporting global conservation efforts? then visit the Alliance for International Reforestation, or donate now to help today.