Yellowstone: Because what could be more epic than a park on top of a supervolcano.

Following our visit to Craters of the Moon in Idaho, we turned to the northeast, making our way towards the wilderness and famed national parks of northern Wyoming. Our first stop was none other than the flagship park of the National Park Service: the iconic Yellowstone.

Apart from its distinction as the first national park, Yellowstone is also a geologist nerd’s delight: It’s essentially 2.2 million acres atop an ancient supervolcano. Everything in the park – from the rivers and lakes, to the flora and fauna – is in turn affected by the volcanic forces at work. Within the 30 by 45 mile caldera are some of the most impressive geysers and hot springs in the world, including the emblematic Old Faithful and Grand Prismatic Springs, along with lesser known (but equally awesome) features like Dragon’s Breath, Artists Paintpots, and others.

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Yellowstone gets its name from the colored rock surrounding the Yellowstone River, which winds its way throughout the park.

(Important note: When exploring the park’s geysers and hot springs, stick to the boardwalks. The surrounding area is not only fragile, but surrounded by boiling sulfuric acid; you will die a horrible death if you jump in. ūüėä )

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These helpful signs found throughout the park show the impending doom that awaits if you step off the boardwalk. You will get hurt while onlookers point and laugh or walk away indifferently.

We spent a total of 4 days in Yellowstone, which we agreed was still not enough time to fully take in and appreciate this massive park. That said, we tried our best to explore as much of it as we could by foot and by bike.

One of our favorite runs/hikes took us to the summit of Mt. Washburn and back down. We started at the trailhead on Dunraven Pass, just off Grand Loop Road. From there, we climbed roughly ~1,500 feet over 3.5 miles to the summit. Along the way, we were afforded sweeping views of the surrounding meadows and countryside, awash in varying shades of lavender, rose, and yellow wildflower blooms.

Near the summit we were happily greeted by a small herd of bighorn sheep! They seemed unafraid of humans, and we did our best to give them sufficient space as we continued to make our way to the summit.

Check out our route up Mt. Washburn here!

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Bighorn sheep silently judging our mountain running skills near the summit of Mount Washburn.

(Another important note: Yellowstone provides a refuge to several species of wildlife; apart from bighorn sheep, it’s also home to buffalo, elk, moose, grizzly and black bears, wolves, and others. If you encounter any wild animal in the park, please be respectful of them and give them space. The park offers guidelines of 100 yards for non-carnivorous species like buffalo and elk, and 200 yards for carnivorous species like bear and wolves. Additionally, it’s a good idea to carry – and know how to use! – bear spray when running, hiking, or biking in Yellowstone or other parks in the region. While bears are not generally aggressive unless provoked, it’s best to be prepared).

The following day, we opted for a bike ride that took us on a 68 mile loop from Canyon Village clockwise to Norris, through Mammoth Hot Springs to Tower, and back up Mt. Washburn before descending back into Canyon. While the ride was challenging – with nearly 6,000 feet of climbing – it was also one of the best ways to experience the the park. We were able to see so much that we otherwise would have missed in the car – including a big bull buffalo rolling in the dust on the side of the road (!), just barely hidden by a small pine grove, or a pair of marmot chasing each other over and around fallen trees.

On our ride, we made another ascent up Mt. Washburn, this time starting from the northern side at the Tower-Roosevelt junction, and making our way up 2,300+ feet over ~10 miles to the summit. The climb offered us breathtaking (quite literally) views of the valley below that we would not have enjoyed or appreciated as much if we had been speeding by in our little Toyota.

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Our bike ride took us through some of the most beautiful – and less traveled – areas of Yellowstone.

Check out our bike route here! (FYI, if you opt to do this route, Mammoth offers a nice halfway(-ish) point for refilling your water bottles).

Before closing out this entry on Yellowstone, we owe a shoutout to Xanterra, the company that manages much of the lodging and dining throughout Yellowstone. They make a concerted effort to prioritize environmental stewardship in everything they do: from building their lodges with beetle-killed pine, to eliminating plastic and styrofoam from both lodging and restaurants. We mention this, because this was in marked contrast to the environmental *irresponsibility* we observed in the dining, general stores, and lodging at Grand Tetons, our next stop.

So our final tally for Yellowstone: 68 miles biked; 26 miles run/hiked; hundreds of buffalo, 10 bighorn sheep, 6 elk, 3 moose, 2 pika, 2 marmot, and 1 bear (grizzly!) sighted.

Interested in going? With ideal weather conditions, late spring and summer are the most popular times to visit Yellowstone. If you’re planning to visit during the months of April – August, be sure to book your lodging/camping reservations months ahead of time.

Fee? Yes – $30 per vehicle for a day pass; national park annual pass also accepted.

Dogs and other pets? Yes, but not on trails. MTB? Yes – on designated trails. Check signs!

Next stop: Grand Tetons!

Exploring the Martian landscape of Craters of the Moon!

Following an all-too-brief stay in Tahoe, the AIR Adventures team headed east, to Idaho, and a pit stop at Craters of the Moon National Monument.

Located just north of the Snake River Plain in Central Idaho, the wonderfully bizarre landscape of this park seems to bubble up from the surrounding plains like some strange brew from an underground cauldron. Indeed, this descriptor is not far from the truth, as the park’s myriad of craters, fissures, and fossilized lava flows that comprise some 750,000 acres owe their existence to the region’s intense seismic activity and¬†violent volcanic past. The most recent eruption occurred only 2,000 (!) years ago.

We opted to explore this strange and somewhat unsettling landscape by foot, as mountain bikes are not permitted on the trails. Additionally, there are a few areas where you have the option to explore caves formed by ancient lava tubes, and which are only accessible by foot (hint: bring a headlamp!).

 

Our day hike took us from the very top of the Inferno Cone – which at 6181 ft afforded beautiful panoramic views of the entire valley – to the caldera of the immense North Crater, and finally down to the subterranean maze of the Buffalo Caves. Along the way we encountered people of all ages and walks of life enjoying the wonders of the park, including the largest group of Boy Scouts we’ve ever seen. We have no idea how the Scout Masters kept them all accounted for.

Check out our route here!

Apart from being an ideal destination for losing a Boy Scout, Craters of the Moon also is an important ecological site that sustains a diversity of plant and animal life – including six species of bats that make their home in the lava tubes.

¬†Interested in going? Check out the park’s website here for information on hikes and other activities inside the park. One important note: With the dark volcanic rock and ash, it can get particularly hot during summer months, so try to plan your visit early in the day.

Fee? Yes Р$15 per vehicle. National Park Annual Pass also accepted. Pets? In the campground, park lot, and on paved roads. Not on trails. MTB? No.

Next stop: Yellowstone and the Grand Tetons!

Kicking off our tour of parks, with a visit to Tahoe!

 

This week, the AIR Adventures team kicked off our tour of national and state parks, which will take us through some of the most beautiful landscapes in the American West!

We started things off with a trip to Lake Tahoe, which some have heralded as “the best lake in America.”

Situated on the border of California and Nevada, Lake Tahoe is the largest alpine lake in North America, and the second deepest after Crater Lake in Oregon. The majority of the lake’s watershed is protected land, with several state parks including Sand Harbor; Sugar Pine Point; Spooner Lake; and of course the eponymous Lake Tahoe State Park.

The area is popular year-round – offering a myriad of lakeside activities in the summer, and skiing or snowboarding in the winter. Apart¬†from being an Instagram-perfect vacation destination, though, Lake Tahoe also provides important ecological benefits as a watershed. Additionally, it’s home to numerous protected or endangered species, including the bald eagle and kokanee salmon, as well as rare plant species like the Lake Tahoe watercress.

On our visit, we took advantage of the beautiful blue-sky July weather to explore the region by bike and by foot. Our first venture took us on a 70+ mile bike ride around the entire lake, which included 4,000+ feet of climbing over a mix of long, gradual mountain inclines  and gentle rollers.

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The area has several miles of bike trails, taking you along the outskirts of the lake and through rolling countryside.

Throughout the ride, we were afforded panoramic vistas of the lake and surrounding mountains, which were surprisingly still snow-capped in late July owing to the record snowfall the region received this past winter. The views were only somewhat marred by the seemingly endless traffic in both directions (FYI, if you’re not already aware, you could say that Lake Tahoe is *somewhat* of a popular tourist destination. On the weekend we were there, it seemed like everyone within a 2,000 mile radius also had the same idea to visit. It was crowded). However, even with the bumper-to-bumper traffic, cars were generally respectful, and gave us plenty of room to pass.

Check out our ride here!

The next day, we opted to avoid dealing with traffic and  ventured out for a run along the trails of Spooner Lake State Park. This Nevada park is about 8 miles to the east of Lake Tahoe, and is home to two  equally picturesque lakes of its own: Spooner and Marlette. Our run took us point-to-point from one lake to the other, and back along the Marlette Lake Trail. The route climbed over 1,600 feet through rustling alpine groves and  high mountain meadows Рwith epic mountain views the entire way.

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Exploring the Marlene Lake trail, on a brilliant late summer afternoon.

Check out our route here!

Interested in going? Be advised that Lake Tahoe and surrounding areas are popular year-round, and can be particularly crowded on weekends and holidays. Plan in advance and make your reservations early. If you’re looking to do a hike or trip to the beach, you should also arrive early in the morning, as parking fills up quickly. (On our bike ride, we observed no less than 4 rather heated arguments over parking. Don’t be one of those guys – plan in advance.)

As for the state parks in the area: they will likely require a fee of $6 – $10. Most are dog and mountain-bike friendly, but be sure to check signs beforehand.

Finally, it’s important to note that despite being a beloved travel destination, Lake Tahoe is under threat due to development and associated pollution. Studies estimate that the clarity of the lake has decreased substantially due to pollution from stormwater runoff associated with construction. Pollution of the lake in turn affects species that depend upon it for survival, including those found in the Truckee River fed by the lake. That said, efforts by local environmental groups like Keep Tahoe Blue have made substantial gains in protecting and restoring the lake and surrounding areas.

Interested in supporting global conservation efforts? Then check out the website of our sister organization, the Alliance for International Reforestation, here!

Next stop: Craters of the Moon National Monument!

 

 

 

 

 

In celebration of national parks – preserving ‘everyone’s stories’ (part 2).

Some 145 years ago on March 1, 1872, then-president Ulysses S. Grant signed a bill creating the nation’s first national park – Yellowstone. However, it wasn’t until decades later, in 1916, that the National Park Service (NPS) was created to manage and protect the large – and growing – number of parks throughout the U.S. The battle to protect the Grand Canyon was instrumental to the development¬†of the NPS.

In our last blog entry, we highlighted the environmental value of our national parks. This latest entry focuses on their historical value – and¬†the role they play in preserving ‘everyone’s stories.’

While national parks play a prominent role in protecting natural landscapes and unique environments, they play an equally important role in protecting the diverse histor(ies) of our nation – dating back to the Paleo-Indian tribes who first set foot in North America some 12,000 years ago.

The iconic Grand Canyon is a prime example of a park preserving both nature and history. As one of the Seven Natural Wonders of the World, the Grand Canyon¬†has become a worldwide symbol for the grandeur of the American West. The park – designated as a UNESCO World Heritage site – is over 1.2 million acres in the northwest part of Arizona. The canyon itself is a geological marvel, averaging a depth of 4,000 feet for roughly 277 miles. Moreover, the park provides a wealth of biological diversity with three different desert types and five distinct ‘life zones’ – each home to several rare and endemic plant and animal species like the desert bighorn sheep and desert shrew.

Moreover,¬†the Grand Canyon also played a¬†pivotal¬†role in the development of our National Park System: it was in part out of a desire to protect the canyon that Stephen Mather fought to establish the NPS, as a way of better managing and protecting the parks. While the Grand Canyon did not gain official park status until 1919, nearly 3 years after the NPS was established, many credit it with Mather’s drive to develop¬†and lead the NPS as its first director.

The human history of the Grand Canyon dates back much further than the creation of the NPS, of course: artifacts dating back nearly 12,000 years have been discovered within the canyon, evidence of early Paleo-Indian tribes. Currently, 11 traditionally-associated tribes and historic ethnic groups are involved in co-managing the park, as part of the preservation of their cultural heritage. These include the Havasupai, Hopi, Hualapai, Navajo, Paiute, White Mountain Apache, Yavapai Apache, and Zuni tribes.

Interested in visiting?¬†Check out the park’s website here, which includes information on how to plan your visit, as well as important weather advisories. The AIR Adventures team had the privilege of visiting as part of our cross-country road trip in 2015. We stayed at the historic El Tovar Hotel, built in 1905 on the South Rim. We recommend taking some time to hike or run the Bright Angel Trail, a 6 mile one-way trail that starts from the South Rim and takes you on a scenic tour into the canyon. A note of caution, though! The trail goes¬†straight down –¬†meaning the distance you go down equals the distance you have to come back up! Do not underestimate the challenge of the hike back out of the canyon.

Fee? Yes Р$30 per vehicle.

Bikes? Yes Рin designated areas. Rentals are available on the South Rim.

Dogs? Yes Рin designated areas, and on leashes. The South Rim trails are particularly dog friendly.

Interested in learning more? Then check out the Grand Canyon site here, or to learn more about the NPS and its history, check out their webpage here.

Interested in supporting global conservation efforts? 

Then check out the Alliance for International Reforestation, a globally-recognized organization dedicated to sustainable, community-based reforestation efforts. Pledge to donate today!

In celebration of national parks (part 1).

Did you know that the U.S. National Park Service covers more than 84 million acres of land, employs over 22,000 workers, and had over 307 million visitors in 2015?

From the subtropical wilderness of the Everglades¬†in Florida, to the arctic tundra of Denali ‚Äď the environmental, historical, and social value of our national parks is¬†immeasurable.

In this first entry of a 3-part series, we highlight the environmental value¬†of¬†our 59 national parks – what many consider to be ‘America’s Best Idea.’¬†We write this series out of incredible appreciation for these national symbols and treasures – and also out of concern for their future preservation.

This past year, the AIR Adventures team undertook an epic cross-country road trip, from east coast to west coast, where we were able to experience firsthand the wonders of our most famous and treasured parks, including the Grand Canyon, Mesa Verde, and Death Valley ‚Äď to name a few.

Of all the parks we saw, the one that stands out as best capturing their collective environmental value is the iconic Yosemite.

This park, one of the oldest in the National Park System, covers an astonishing 747, 956 acres in the Sierra Nevada mountain range in northern California, with ~95% of it ¬†designated as wilderness. While Yosemite is internationally renowned for its impressive granite formations and its contributions to epic vacation photos, few realize the important role the park plays in supporting plant and animal life: the park claims five distinct vegetation zones, and more than 225,000 acres of old growth forest ‚Äď with untouched groves of fir, pine, and ancient sequoias. This habitat is home to over 250 species of animals – including the protected Sierra Nevada bighorn sheep and red fox. Apart from providing an important habitat for wildlife, these trees also provide an important source of sequestration for CO2 and other greenhouse gases.

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Thank you, Yosemite, for being you. And for the epic photos. Not to mention protection of plant and animal diversity and source of carbon sequestration. And oh yes the water. 

Yosemite offers more than habitat for regional flora and fauna, however. Thee park supports life in California more generally, as the¬†Hetch Hetchy reservoir, located within the¬†park, is a central water supply for Northern California. An estimated 85% of San Francisco’s water comes from this reservoir.

Finally, it’s worth noting that Yosemite’s environmental value is equalled only by its historical value: it was this park, and John Muir’s commitment to protecting it, that spurred development of the National Park System.

Interested in going?¬†We recommend a visit to Yosemite for anyone with a passion for the environment, outdoor adventures, and/or history. The park offers plenty of opportunities for both daylong and extended stays – check out all their offerings for both individuals and families here. But plan well in advance! This is one of our nation’s most popular parks, and reservations for both campgrounds as well as hotels fill up quickly.

During our trip, AIR Adventures took to the trails in and around the valley for what proved to be one of our favorite trail running expeditions to-date. A particularly beautiful – and challenging! – route took us from the valley floor to the top of Yosemite Falls. The route was fairly short, about 7.2 miles round-trip, but packed in a whopping 2,700 feet of elevation gain in the initial climb up! Check out the route here.

Fee? Yes – $30 per vehicle, $15 per pedestrian or bike. (Or you can get a national park pass, which we highly recommend!)

Dogs or other pets? Yes – on leashes and on designated trails.

Bikes? Road – yes; MTB – no.

Stay tuned for our next entry in this series!

Update: The Trump administration has issued a media blackout for the National Park System. And Congress has recently passed legislation that will make it easier to sell off public lands Рincluding national parks. More recently, Congress has voted to make it easier to drill in national parks, and is now moving to repeal the 1973 Endangered Species Act. Concerned? Then call your representative: 202.224.3121. This number will allow you to connect with your Senate and House representative

Interested in supporting global conservation efforts? Then check out the Alliance for International Reforestation here: http://www.airguatemala.org